Coming Up…

It’s been a bit quiet on here lately, but that’s only because I’ve been busy reading and reviewing.

Reviews of books coming up include:

Something Like Breathing by Angela Readman (And Other Stories)

A trio of Horror novellas published by Dead Ink Press: Holt House by L.G Vey , A Dedicated Friend by Shirley Longford and Judderman D.A Northwood.

In the Shadow of Wolves by Alvydas Šlepikas (translated from the Lithuanian by Romas Kinka: Oneworld Publications)

Ducks, Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann (Galley Beggars Press)

And books currently being read to review:

Skin Can Hold by Vahni Capildeo (Carcanet Press)

Handling Stolen Goods by Degna Stone (Peepal Tree Press)

REVIEW: The Tempest by Steve Sem-Sandberg

Steve Sem-Sandberg’s novel (translated by Anna Paterson), as the title of it sounds, is heavily indebted to Shakespeare’s famous island play. Reading this novel though, it cast a light onto Shakespeare’s play that is not always accounted for and the issue of this human, but sometimes, dangerous desire to change and transform people was explored.

‘The Tempest however, in the face of its multifarious interpretations, is a play about the act of interpretation and ultimately a tale about whose story has the power to preside over everybody else’s.’

 

photo: Nordin Agency
Read the full review here

REVIEW: Rod Mengham – Grimspound and Inhabiting Art

Rod Mengham’s multimodal work of essays, poetry and criticism was reviewed on Bookmunch. I was enamoured with this book that mediated on place and language and when I discussed his poem that is based on the fictional, but plausible, Nostratic dictionary devised by Palaeolinguist, Aharon Dolgopolsky, I wrote:

What Mengham does here is conjure a voice that is rooted, not in history, but speculation. We read as a family, or clan, ‘cook with stones’ whilst the father hunts for food creating a narrative for the kind of family we expect to have lived on Grimspound whilst toying with this expectation. We are dislocated from the actual historical moment and a lack of syntax accentuates, what feels like, an ethereal voice, yet there’s a continual irony impacted by its sense of being conjured and based on a fiction.

Read the full review here

photo: Carcanet